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Between the Generalized Holographic Model and Data Science

faculty article May 26, 2020

By Dr. Ines Urdaneta, Research Scientist at Resonance Science Foundation

A couple of months ago, I presented a talk at the Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla’s Physics Institute (IFUAP), the topic being the Generalized Holographic Theory developed by Nassim Haramein. The invitation was serendipity; Haramein’s Holographic model prediction of the proton muonic radius – within experimental precision – had just been confirmed by the latest electronic hydrogen measurements from Bezginov et al. 2019. These measurements also confirmed that the standard model is off by 4%, way below experimental certitude.

I wasn’t sure which frame would fit best as an introduction to the subject for the presentation. Should I start with black hole thermodynamics, or the holographic principle? Despite the pertinence of both these topics, neither quite captured the dimension of the concern I had. The unified model demonstrates scaling from the Planck – and even...

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Sound has Mass and thus, Gravity?

faculty article May 25, 2020
By Dr. Ines Urdaneta, research scientist at Resonance Science Foundation

In order for sound to be affected by gravity and to exercise gravity, it has to carry some mass of its own. But our common observations showed that sound is vibration traveling through media; energy traveling through material carrying no mass of its own. Until now, intuitively we see that the mass, through which the sound wave or vibration is traveling, must affect the speed and propagation of the sound wave through that media. Sound waves travel at different speeds in different mediums — water, oil, wood. The displacement from an equilibrium position of mass (atoms in a material) is perceived as sound. Seems everything is understood, right? Well, here is where the piece that’s missing comes into play: the energy promoting the displacement of the atoms carries mass of its own! That’s what the results of the research presented below conclude.

Let’s see how… the atoms in a material...

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The First Image of a Black Hole is Finally Here!

black holes science news Apr 29, 2020

 By Dr. Ines Urdaneta, Research Scientist at Resonance Science Foundation.
 
For some time now we have been following the Event Horizon Telescope initiative (EHT) aiming at the obtention of the first image of the EH of a Black Hole (BH) for Sagittarius A (Sag. A*), located at the center of our own galaxy, the milky way. Given the fact that Sag. A* nuclei is much less active that Messier 87 (M87*), the image reported first is that of M87*. Even though M87* is 2000 times farther away, it is 2000 times more massive. This compensates exactly the distance, with a higher nuclei activity allowing a better resolution and faster data analysis than Sag. A*.

So finally, the day has come! The moment couldn't be more exciting. First EHT results for the shadow of the BH, which is 55 million light years away from Earth, with a mass 6.5 billion times the mass of our Sun and located at the center of M87*, have been announced worldwide today, April 10th 2019, at the same time by different...

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What’s Really Going on Inside a Neutron Star

science news Mar 14, 2020
by Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Scientists are finally getting closer to figuring out the puzzle of the structure of neutron stars and revealing the nature of their ultra-dense interiors.

In theories of stellar evolution, neutron stars are considered one of the end states of stars, along with white dwarfs and black holes. As a star evolves it will enter stages of expansion as hydrogen is fused into helium and so on through the periodic table of elements. Depending on the mass of the star, a limit will be reached whereby nuclear fusion can no longer take place and the star is no longer able to overcome the immense gravitational force which it has been holding back for all these years. As a result, the star implodes, ejecting its outer layers as a planetary nova or a supernova, leaving only a mere remnant of its former self behind – or so the story goes.

For massive stars, the implosion is so great that it crushes its stellar matter to...

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Physicist Nassim Haramein’s Prediction that the Universe is Rotating Receives a Second Strong Observational Confirmation

faculty article Mar 05, 2020

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

“…there is currently no explanation why the axes of quasars are aligned with the axis of the large group in which they are embedded” – Damien Hutsemékers, astronomer, University of Liège in Belgium

In the Resonance Science Foundation article The Rotating Universe, the evidence for a large-scale spatial coherence of the spin axes of quasars spanning mega parsecs (billions of light years) was reported. This was the first incontrovertible evidence of a cosmological-scale structure, or anisotropy, of the universe—following the controversial findings of dark flow, the axis of evil, the great wall and great voids, and the great cold spot.

Such large-scale structure is problematic to most cosmological models because the universe is assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous; in fact, this is so central to cosmological modeling that it is called the cosmological principle. Any...

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Does Information Carry Mass?

faculty article Feb 21, 2020
by Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

If information carries mass, could it be the dark matter physicists are craving?

The existence of dark energy and dark matter was inferred in order to correctly predict the expansion of the universe and the rotational velocity of galaxies. In this view, dark energy could be the source of the centrifugal force expanding the universe (it is what accounts for the Hubble constant in the leading theories), while dark matter could be the centripetal force (an additional gravity source) necessary to stabilize galaxies and clusters of galaxies, since there isn’t enough ordinary mass to keep them together. Among other hypotheses, dark energy and dark matter are believed to be related to the vacuum fluctuations, and huge efforts have been devoted to detecting it. The fact that no evidence has yet been found calls for a change of perspective that could be due to information theory.

How could we measure the mass...

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Frame-Dragging Caught in Action

astrophysics science news Feb 14, 2020
by Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Research Scientist

An astrophysical system has just demonstrated frame dragging for the first time.

The dragging of space time by a rotating mass, otherwise known as frame-dragging, was predicted by Einstein’s general relativity. Einstein postulated that not only does a mass curve spacetime, but it will also drag local spacetime into motion around itself as it rotates, much like the air in a tornado. The amount of drag is thus directly proportional to the spin.

A few years later, in 1918, Austrian physicists Josef Lense and Hans Thirring predicted that the dragging of spacetime due to a rotating celestial body – frame-dragging – would force a nearby orbiting body into precession. That is, the closer you are to the rotating body, the more you are pulled around with it – which for another rotating body forces its axis of rotation to continuously change direction with the changing pull along the orbit. This effect is now...

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A Deeper Look into Black Holes

by Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Astrophysicist

A deeper look into one of the most intriguing objects has just been revealed.

Black holes are typically observed by the light given off by the surrounding material, such as accretion disks or high velocity jets known as quasars. In 2015, this was extended to gravitational waves when the first gravitational wave was detected from the merger of a pair of black holes.

Then, last year the first direct picture of a black hole was revealed which captured the shadow of the black hole on the accretion disc. Read more here.

Now a recent international study, led by Dr William Alston of the Cambridge University, has taken it one step further, allowing us to peer into a black hole deeper than ever before.

Utilizing a technique known as X-ray reverberation mapping, the team of scientists set about observing the highly variable active galactic nuclei (AGN) IRAS 13224-3809. Located a mere billion light years away, the bright AGN...

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Neurons Act Not As Simple Logic Gates, But As Complex, Multi-Unit Processing Systems

by William Brown, Resonance Science Research Scientist

A study published in the journal Science has upended 80 years of conventional wisdom in computational neuroscience that has modeled the neuron as a simple point-like node in a system, integrating signals and passing them along. This neuron-as-integrator model, also known as the “dumb” neuron model, has severely restricted the conception of what a neuron is capable of doing, and hence how neuronal networks and the brain as a whole functions.

This has not only impeded the development of a complete understanding of neuronal activity in the higher brain regions of the cortex, but it has also adversely affected computer science, significantly limiting the development of neuromorphic computational networks because they have been based on an incomplete model. Empirical investigations are now suggesting that scientists re-evaluate neuronal information processing as a much more complex system—one that may not have...

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The Rotating Universe

By William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

When looking back into the deep past of the Universe, which means looking out over vast cosmological distances of space, there are observed a peculiar set of galaxies emitting a tremendous amount of energy. These early galaxies, known variously as quasars, blazars, radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars, are all bodies classified as active galactic nuclei. These objects are some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe, if the name blazar was not at all evident of this fact. Active galactic nuclei represent a confirmation of physicist Nassim Haramein’s prediction that black holes are the spacetime structure that forms the seed around which galaxies and stars form. Indeed, it is now widely understood that the early formation of galaxies, producing active galactic nuclei, are in fact due to the action of supermassive black holes – black holes in upwards of a million to a billion solar masses.

The...

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