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Another Validation of Haramein’s Theory: Physicists Confirm that Black Holes Admit Vortex Structure!

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

Understanding the microscopic structure of black holes has been a challenge for physicists. The recent work from Gia Dvali, Florian Kühnel and Michael Zantedeschi entitled Vortexes in Black Holes, and published in Physics Review Letters, is providing a framework from which such understanding can be attained, while at the same time validating Nassim Haramein’s holographic approach.

Dvali et al. propose that black holes could be understood as a graviton condensate at the critical point of a quantum phase transition, based both on a graviton-condensate description of a black hole and on a correspondence between black holes and generic objects with maximal entropy compatible with unitarity; the so-called saturons. Saturons are a saturated state collective behavior of gravitons, i.e., a Bose Einstein Condensate (BEC) of gravitons, situation that is possible when gravitons are confined in a volume of space,...

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Scattering Amplitudes Help Physicists Investigate the Behaviour of Sound Waves through Solids

Credit: Grant Remmen

By Amal Pushp, Affiliate Physicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

Scattering amplitudes are a quantum field theoretic concept that allows the computation and representation of various scattering processes involved in particle physics. It is basically a probability amplitude, an entirely mathematical concept, that aids the description of elementary particles and their associated physical systems. This highly rigorous technique is being utilized as a research tool in various subfields of theoretical physics like Yang-Mills theory, Chern-Simons theory, Supergravity (SUGRA), etc.

Conventionally, such computations have been probed using Feynman diagrams, however, it has a limited range of applicability and that’s where scattering amplitudes come in and express their overarching role. For instance, to describe the interactions of fundamental particles, one would have to manually fit thousands of Feynman diagrams into the computer which would make the...

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An Eventful Horizon

Scientists utilize elements of the Haramein Quantum Gravity Holographic Solution to solve the Black Hole Information Loss Paradox


By: William Brown, scientist at the Resonance Science Foundation

In our quotidian experience the feature of spacetime locality seems to be an indelible feature of a rational reality; the idea that effects follow their causes, which we know from special relativity requires that no signal or information travel faster than the speed of light. If a signal were to travel faster than the speed of light, an effect might precede its cause—so for instance a superluminal spaceship could make a roundtrip voyage and return to a frame-of-reference where it had not yet departed. The problem with locality, no matter how indelible it seems to our rational, is that both quantum physics and relativity theory have properties that seemingly permit non-local interactions: in the former there are Einstein Podolsky Rosen (EPR) correlations, and in the latter, there...

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The Generalized Holographic Model, Part II: Quantum Gravity and the Holographic Mass Solution

Image credit: Shutterstock

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

In the former article entitled The Generalized Holographic Model, Part I: The Holographic Principle, we introduced the holographic principle as developed by David Bohm, Gerard 't Hooft, Jacob Bekenstein and Stephen Hawking. This principle states that the information contained in the volume of a Black hole is holographically present in the boundary or event horizon of the black hole. We then introduced the generalization of such principle by Nassim Haramein, where he includes the volume information or degrees of freedom in the volume as well. This generalization allows to define a holographic ratio that accounts for the surface-to-volume entropy or information potential transfer, which is a steady state or thermodynamical equilibrium, equivalent to a kinetic rate constant.  

In this second part we will see why Haramein’s generalized holographic approach gives a quantized...

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Probing Quantum Magnetism with Near Absolute Zero SU(N) Atoms

By Amal Pushp, Affiliate Physicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

Absolute zero is the temperature at which all physical dynamics come to a halt. The laws of physics however do not allow us to attain absolute zero. This fact unfolds from a fundamental feature of quantum mechanics according to which fluctuations are always occurring at the quantum level and the quantum particles always have enough energy to continue their dynamical motion unlike in a classical system. Such a system contains quantum mechanical energy even at absolute zero and this energy is technically called zero-point energy. However, physicists can achieve temperatures close to absolute zero in an advanced laboratory. Examples where working near absolute zero is common include quantum phenomena like Bose-Einstein condensation, superconductivity, superfluidity, etc.

Now in yet another situation, physicists from Japan and the US have succeeded in cooling atoms of Ytterbium (an element also used in making atomic...

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The Generalized Holographic Model, Part I: The Holographic Principle

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

The holographic principle is one of the first introductions of the idea that information may be present holographically within certain structures in the universe — namely, black holes. At this point, one may start to notice how the scientific narrative has been progressively and very subtly switching from terms like energy, forces, particles, and fields, to this word: information.

When we think of information, we think of computers and programming and bits of information, expressed in values of 0 or 1 in a binary system. This all is a subset of a larger field called information theory, whose goal is to explain all features of reality as emerging from information exchange and its properties.

This article explores further the topic, giving a brief overview of the history and development of the holographic principle behind the fundamental concept of the generalized holographic model developed by Nassim...

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First Detection of Intergalactic High Energy Neutrinos Linked to a Blazar

By Amal Pushp, Affiliate Physicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

Among all the various particles that exist in nature, neutrinos are one of the most peculiar of all. Neutrinos are elementary particles that are essentially produced during radioactive decay and are named so because they do not carry any charge and hence are electrically neutral. It would be quite surprising to the reader that neutrinos are ever-present and are fluctuating around us all the time. They also penetrate the earth with little to no interaction.

Neutrinos essentially travel at the speed of light and are not deflected in presence of magnetic fields. All these properties make the detection of neutrinos a cumbersome process. In view of the fact that neutrino interactions are usually quite low, scientists have built a neutrino observatory at the South pole, called the IceCube Neutrino Observatory which consists of pure and stable ice having a thickness of a cubic kilometer, which substantially acts as the...

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Anomalous Hall effect in Antiferromagnetic Crystal May Enable Computation with Atomic Spin

By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

Digital Computations are based on the ability to read, write, and erase an on/off state in a material, representing the ‘0’ and ‘1’ of binary data. In today’s integrated circuits, this is achieved via transistors, which are semiconductor materials— like silicon or germanium (tetrahedral elements)— that can switch electrical signals to an “on” or “off” state and therefore function as the binary state, or logic gate in a digital computation.

In this way, the metal-oxide-silicon transistors in integrated circuits forms the memory cells of the chips, and because of the relative ease of fabrication, scalability, and low-power consumption such chips are found in nearly all digital electronic devices, from smartphones to TVs. The civilization-scale effect of this functional material with easily controlled binary state cannot be overstated, as even...

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Origin of Quantum Mechanics III: The Atomic Structure and the Electron

Source of Image here.  

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta  / Physicist at  Resonance Science Foundation

In our previous article entitled Origin of Quantum Mechanics II: Black Body Radiation and Quantization of the Electromagnetic Field we saw that quantum mechanics started from the combined results of two experiments called black body radiation and photoelectric effect, which indicated that matter could only exchange energy -absorb or emit- through discrete packets, quanta of energy that were called photons, which gave a corpuscular aspect to light. Light, which is observed macroscopically as a continuous wave, must then be composed of these discrete packets of energy called photons. This allowed light and matter to exchange photons, i.e., integer units of energy.

The main interlocutor between light and atoms are the electrons that make up the atom. Roughly speaking, it is the electron inside the atom that absorbs or emits electromagnetic radiation in the material, which,...

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Contextuality: An Obscure Yet Powerful Feature of Quantum Mechanics

By Amal Pushp, Affiliate Physicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

A pair of quantum entities spatially separated in the network of spacetime displays a mysterious correlation when measured. This quantum correlation is commonly referred to as entanglement. In the current age, phenomena involving entanglement and its diverse applications are inevitable, however, it would be quite surprising to the reader at first that this quantum phenomenon was dismissed as an impossible spooky scenario by none other than Albert Einstein who is believed to be one of the founding fathers of quantum physics itself.

Entanglement, also popularly known as non-locality within scientific circles, has become a well-established topic over the decades. However, there is another quantum aspect that is equally interesting but probably most of us haven’t heard of it. This lesser-known phenomenon of quantum mechanics is termed contextuality. To put it simply, contextuality says that properties of...

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