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Astronomy Accessible for People with Hearing Loss

by Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

How does it looks like, how does it sounds like, how would it feel? We perceive our reality through our senses: sight, smell, touch, hearing, taste. We usually don’t include the sense of perceiving how it would feel to be someone else… the sense of empathy. Most of our education is focused on the standard view that everyone shares the same senses, hence, they perceive almost the same. But even if we had the same senses, do they perceive the same? Discrimination arrives when we disregard the differences by assuming we all do.

In the USA alone there are approximately 11 million people with serious hearing problems. It is estimated to be 360 million around the globe. Astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, Gillian Wilson and Mario De Leo-Winkler (now director of the National System of Researchers SNI of Mexico), have teamed with teachers at the California School for the Deaf,...

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Super-Fast 3D Printers

By Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Astrophysicist

A new printer known as the ‘replicator’ could soon make the innovative and futuristic 3D printers a thing of the past.

3D printers came about in the early 1980’s and were considered a modern miracle. They work by depositing a material, such as plastic, layer by layer to reproduce a 3D generated computer image. Since their humble beginnings, and massively expensive prices, in which they were only able to produce functional prototypes they have since made significant advancements in precision. With such precision and the relatively lower prices they have become common place for the production of anything and everything from aerospace and automotive to medical.

However, researchers in California have now unveiled a new 3D printer known as the ‘replicator’. Based on tomography – which is the process of obtaining a 3D image of non-visible ‘internal’ structure by combining...

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Panpsychism as an Observational Science

faculty article Feb 06, 2019
By William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Biophysicist

One of the key postulations of the paper The Unified Spacememory Network, by Nassim Haramein et al., is that the intelligence and seeming orchestrated behavior underlying the self-organizing dynamics of matter and energy in the universe is based in a fundamental informational structure of spacetime, the Planck field. Since there is information processing activity occurring down to the smallest scale with Planck qubits, which we postulate cannot only process information but store memory, there are the basic components of a proto-conscious intelligence field present in the very fabric of spacetime—what we refer to as spacememory. The scientific model in which consciousness is present in all domains of the universe and underlies all phenomena is known as panpsychism.

In a recently published paper, professor Gregory Matloff makes the argument for panpsychism as a viable theory that can be evaluated experimentally to...

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Is Spacetime A Quantum Code?

by Dr. Olivier Alirol, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

In 2014, physicists found evidence of a deep connection between quantum error correction and the nature of space, time and gravity. Generally, gravity is defined as the fabric of space and time but beyond Einstein’s theory, there must be a quantum origin from which the space-time somehow emerges.

The three physicists at the origin of this discovery, Ahmed Almheiri, Xi Dong and Daniel Harlow, suggested that a holographic “emergence” of space-time works just like a quantum error-correcting code. In their paper “Bulk Locality and Quantum Error Correction in AdS/CFT” published in its first version in November 2014, they showed that space-time emerges from this quantum error correction code in an anti-de Sitter (AdS) universes.

The discovery is opening a new way to capture more properties of space-time.

From left: Ahmed Almheiri, Xi Dong and Daniel Harlow originated a powerful new idea...

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Spectral Signatures of a Black Hole Spinning at Almost the Speed of Light

by Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

After a two years analysis on the emission spectra from a 2016 X-ray transient outburst in the black hole system U4 1630-47, obtained by three different independent space missions; Chandra/HEG, AstroSat and MAXI, the leader of the project Dr. Mayukh Pahari and collaborators could determine the spinning and mass of the BH. The estimated spinning rate is 92-95% the speed of light, with a mass of 5-10 M (million solar masses).

Fig 1 below shows the initial signals detected by the MAXI missions. These spectra are further analyzed, decomposed and fitted in order to obtain the final results published here.


Fig.1: 2016 X-ray outburst of 4U 1630–47 as observed by MAXI and Swift/BAT.

With the independent modeling of the broadband data spectra obtained by the three missions, and using the Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations on fitted spectral parameters, they find a range of the black hole spin parameter depicted...

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Topological Materials: A New Dimension of Properties and Their Amazing Applications

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

The word topology refers to the contours of a surface or the shape of an object. In mathematics, topology classifies objects by the number of holes they have. A ball is a sphere with no hole, whereas a doughnut, with its one hole, is topologically different. The ball is topologically equivalent to an apple, and a doughnut to a cup, but not to a ball or a pretzel, since going from one topology to another would require a dramatic change, like ripping a hole. For this reason, the topological states discovered in some materials are robust and resist disruptions, unless they are as dramatic as the one mentioned previously.

Topological materials provide certain electronic states that persist despite a modification to their physical shape. What’s important isn’t the shape itself but the structure of its electronic bands; regions of electronic energy distribution particular to each material. The...

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Quasars Shed New Light on the Hubble Constant

By Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Astrophysicist

The expansion of the universe, as characterized by the Hubble constant, now has a new variable to add to the equation – the light from quasars!

The Hubble constant has long been a topic of debate with early measurements implying values of 625 km/s/Mpc and 500 km/s/Mpc. The latter value was found in 1928, by Edwin Hubble, through his observational studies of the recession velocities of galaxies. Hubble found that the recession velocity of galaxies increased with increasing distance at a proportional rate, now known as the Hubble constant. Since then, the techniques for determining the Hubble constant have undergone much improvement, yet a discrepancy still exists between the different measuring techniques.

The recession velocities of standard candles in the form of Supernovae Type 1a, give a value of 73.48 km/s/Mpc with 2.3% precision. Read more here  and here. However, the alternative method for measuring...

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A Disturbance in the Field

By Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

The Earth’s magnetic field appears to be shifting and geologists don’t know why.

Like most spinning systems, such as stars and planets, the Earth’s magnetic field is assumed to be generated through the motion of electrically conducting fluids – such as a liquid iron core as is thought to be the case for the Earth. All being well, in a perfect idealized ‘physics’ world, the magnetic field would align with the axis of spin. However, the reality is that the Earth’s magnetic field is aligned at an 11-degree angle to the spin axis, hovering somewhere over Canada. The exact location is variable and over the last 180 years the magnetic north pole has been migrating northwestward with movements of up to 25 miles per year.

Variation of the poles is normal and, in some cases, can result in complete reversal of the poles. This can be seen in the magnetic fingerprints stored in...

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The Importance of Mindfulness

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Biophysicist
Studies suggest that mindfulness practices may help people manage stress, cope better with serious illness and reduce anxiety and depression. Many people who practice mindfulness report an increased ability to relax, a greater enthusiasm for life and improved self-esteem.

Meditation, or mindfulness practices, have become a well-accepted way within conventional medicine to maintain mental and physical health. In a medical establishment that generally relies on drugs to combat health problems new insights into the physical and mental health benefits of mindfulness have now been gleamed from many scientific studies.

Studies funded by the National Institute of Health (NIH) in the United States have found links between mindfulness meditation and measurable changes in the brain regions involved in memory, learning and emotion, as well that mindfulness practices may reduce anxiety and hostility among urban youth and lead to...

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The Casimir Torque validated experimentally for the first time

by Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

The Casimir effect, responsible for the attraction of two neutral metallic plates separated 1 micron apart, is one of the most outstanding features of the vacuum influence on the macroscopic world, and has been discussed in former articles. The effect has been measured in a variety of experimental setups, but this is the first time its associated torque has been verified experimentally. The so-called Casimir torque, predicted more than 40 years ago, is a mechanical torque between two optically anisotropic materials, and depends on the electromagnetic fluctuations (EM) of the vacuum -known as vacuum fluctuations- as well as on the dielectric function of the materials, which describes the capacity of an internal charge reorganization property within the material. Optically anisotropic means that the refractive index of the material depends on the polarization and propagation direction of the electromagnetic...

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