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Is the Physical World a Neural Network?

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta. Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

In a former RSF article entitled Between the Generalized Holographic approach and Data Science, we addressed the potential of trained artificial neural networks to replace our scientific models, and the possibility of reality being a numerical simulation was discussed. Somehow we had anticipated this next and very recent work from Vitaly Vanchurin, from the University of Minnesota Duluth, proposing that we live in a neural network. It is an audacious idea!


In our prior article we had anticipated the impact of artificial neural networks and deep machine learning … what we had not foreseen was that they would be used literally as the framework for the theory of everything! There is a saying: "better be a historian, than a prophet", meaning that a historian writes about past events, and so taking small risk, while a prophet takes a huge risk with his predictions. Though, we should not brag about this...

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Blue And Green Colors On Nature Are More Intense … Why?

By Ines Urdaneta, PhD in Physics and Researcher at Resonance Science Foundation.

Image: Evan Leeson/Bob Peterson/lowjumpingfrog. None of these animals contain a single trace of blue pigment.

Colors in nature come mainly from three sources: pigments, structural colors, and bioluminescence.

Have you noticed that some colors are more intense than others in nature?
Such is the case of blue and green colors, compared to reds and the rest. The main reason is that blue and green can be structural colors, while the remaining colors seem to not be part of the team.

Structural coloring is the result of microscopically fine structured surfaces that interfere with visible light, sometimes in combination with pigments. For example, peacock tail feathers are brown pigmented, but because of their microscopic structure, they also reflect blue, turquoise and green light. And they are often iridescent. Thus, structural coloring is a classic optical effect of interference and diffraction, rather than a...

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Neurons Act Not As Simple Logic Gates, But As Complex, Multi-Unit Processing Systems

by William Brown, Resonance Science Research Scientist

A study published in the journal Science has upended 80 years of conventional wisdom in computational neuroscience that has modeled the neuron as a simple point-like node in a system, integrating signals and passing them along. This neuron-as-integrator model, also known as the “dumb” neuron model, has severely restricted the conception of what a neuron is capable of doing, and hence how neuronal networks and the brain as a whole functions.

This has not only impeded the development of a complete understanding of neuronal activity in the higher brain regions of the cortex, but it has also adversely affected computer science, significantly limiting the development of neuromorphic computational networks because they have been based on an incomplete model. Empirical investigations are now suggesting that scientists re-evaluate neuronal information processing as a much more complex system—one that may not have...

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Bioengineer Researchers Discover New Type of Cell Communication

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Biophysicist

Collective intercellular communication through ultra-fast hydrodynamic trigger waves:

Researchers studying one of the longest single cell organisms—Spirostomum ambiguum—which can grow up to lengths of 4mm (a unicellular organism observable to the naked eye) have discovered that it is also one of the fastest cells ever documented. The gargantuan protist can contract its long body by 60% within milliseconds, experiencing an acceleration force of up to 14g.

The contractile behavior protects the unicellular organism from would-be predators, as small vacuoles along the cellular membrane containing toxins are dispersed when undergoing the extreme g forces of the contraction. Remarkably, researchers have discovered that the contractions also generate long-ranged vortex flows that function as hydrodynamic signals to other Spirostomum.

This is the first time that hydrodynamic cellular signaling has been documented, and...

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Missing Molecule Finally Discovered

by Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Astrophysicist

The evolution from the first molecule to the complex chemistry that exists in our universe today is now one step closer to being understood.

When we think of complex chemistry, we usually think of all the matter that exists on our planet which in our atmosphere is a massive 10 trillion trillion molecules per cubic meter. As we move away from our planet this drops exponentially. However, surprising as it may be, space space – like the interstellar and intergalactic regions – are host to a myriad of molecules. Albeit not at quite the same high densities.

How these molecules formed and became the complex chemistry that we see today remains to be fully understood. It is currently agreed that the early universe consisted of only a few kinds of atoms and it wasn’t until the age of 100,000 years that hydrogen and helium combined to form the first molecule – helium hydride. However, although...

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Origins of Quantumbiology – What is Life?

By Dr. Johanna Deinert, MD, RSF Research Scientist

By the end of 2018 the Royal Society has published a review into the emergence of Quantumbiology as a field of scientific interest. Today, we still need to understand life in the context of its physical environment. Despite the impression this field was new, it emerged in synchronicity with the interpretation of Quantum Physics in the early 20th century – about 90 years ago.

Erwin Schrödinger was not the first to discuss the field of Quantumbiology in his famous 1944 book „What is life?”. Shortly after the mathematical framework of Quantum Mechanics was established in 1927, the field of biophysics and biochemistry flourished. The Organicists sought the middle ground between opposing mechanistic and vitalistic worldviews. Founder of the interdisciplinary field of General System Theory Ludwig von Bertalanffy was one of the early pioneers into the explanation of life. As early as 1928 he discusses a...

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Potential Habitability of Exoplanets

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

featured image credit: Jack O’Malley-James/Cornell University: The intense radiation environments around nearby M stars could favor habitable worlds resembling younger versions of Earth.

A primary prediction of the USN model as presented in the Unified Spacememory Network publication by physicist Nassim Haramein, astrophysicist Amira Val Baker, and biologist William Brown is that the prebiotic chemistry that generates organic compounds and even complex biomolecules is occurring in nebulae throughout galaxies—a postulation that is termed universal biogenesis. Under this model, the precursors to cellular biology are abundant throughout the galactic medium, and therefore there is a very high likelihood that wherever conditions are hospitable to organisms, life will take hold there.

Considering the implications of universal biogenesis, it was very exciting when an Earth-like planet was discovered within...

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Inner Clocks and Future Prediction

Article by Dr. Johanna Deinert, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Researchers from University of California – Berkeley found two clocks in our brains with different functions. The paper authored by Assaf Breska and Richard B. Ivry from the Departement of Psychology was published lately in PNAS. There are different locations in the reptilian parts of our brain (the brainstem) where we process present and anticipative time. As well as our sense of orientation in space of the body, our orientation in time is processed by the cerebellum. The anticipatory part is processed in the basal ganglia, meaning the most advanced system of the reptilian brain and the connection to the higher operative systems of the grey matter. One of these basal ganglia is the Thalamus, referred to as “the gate to consciousness” by medical textbooks. It is as well the generator of the brainwave frequencies, hence our conscious activity...

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Life in Deep Earth Totals 15 to 23 Billion Tonnes of Carbon - Hundreds of Times More Than Humans

Article by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Barely living “zombie” bacteria and other forms of life constitute an immense amount of carbon deep within Earth’s subsurface—245 to 385 times greater than the carbon mass of all humans on the surface, according to scientists nearing the end of a 10-year international collaboration to reveal Earth’s innermost secrets.

By: Terry Collins & Katie Pratt; Deep Carbon Observatory

Deep Carbon Observatory collaborators, exploring the ‘Galapagos of the deep,’ add to what’s known, unknown, and unknowable about Earth’s most pristine ecosystem

Bacteria, archaea, and other microbes—some of them zombies—exist even in deepest known subsurface, and they’re weirder than their surface counterparts

~70% of Earth’s bacteria and archaea live underground

Earth’s deep life suggests microbes might inhabit the subsurface of other planets

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A Nanophotonic Structure Used to Entangle Photosynthetic Bacteria

Article by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Biophysicist 

There is an obvious flaw in the current predominant physics model of the fundamental behavior and nature of the universe: current physics theory is a contentious amalgamation of two separate models that seem to be incompatible in characterizing a couple of important properties, like gravity and time. One of the greatest challenges to unifying the description of the microscale, described by quantum physics, with the macroscale, described by Einsteinian mechanics—is delineating the transition between what is considered non-classical, or quantum behavior, and classical behavior that seems characteristic of the macroscale. If “stuff” behaves differently when it is at molecular scales and below, then two different models are needed to describe the “stuff” that comprises the universe; one for the microscopic scale and the other for the macroscopic.

An interesting turn of events...

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