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Neurons Act Not As Simple Logic Gates, But As Complex, Multi-Unit Processing Systems

by William Brown, Resonance Science Research Scientist

A study published in the journal Science has upended 80 years of conventional wisdom in computational neuroscience that has modeled the neuron as a simple point-like node in a system, integrating signals and passing them along. This neuron-as-integrator model, also known as the “dumb” neuron model, has severely restricted the conception of what a neuron is capable of doing, and hence how neuronal networks and the brain as a whole functions.

This has not only impeded the development of a complete understanding of neuronal activity in the higher brain regions of the cortex, but it has also adversely affected computer science, significantly limiting the development of neuromorphic computational networks because they have been based on an incomplete model. Empirical investigations are now suggesting that scientists re-evaluate neuronal information processing as a much more complex system—one that may not have...

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Bioengineer Researchers Discover New Type of Cell Communication

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Biophysicist

Collective intercellular communication through ultra-fast hydrodynamic trigger waves:

Researchers studying one of the longest single cell organisms—Spirostomum ambiguum—which can grow up to lengths of 4mm (a unicellular organism observable to the naked eye) have discovered that it is also one of the fastest cells ever documented. The gargantuan protist can contract its long body by 60% within milliseconds, experiencing an acceleration force of up to 14g.

The contractile behavior protects the unicellular organism from would-be predators, as small vacuoles along the cellular membrane containing toxins are dispersed when undergoing the extreme g forces of the contraction. Remarkably, researchers have discovered that the contractions also generate long-ranged vortex flows that function as hydrodynamic signals to other Spirostomum.

This is the first time that hydrodynamic cellular signaling has been documented, and...

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Missing Molecule Finally Discovered

by Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Astrophysicist

The evolution from the first molecule to the complex chemistry that exists in our universe today is now one step closer to being understood.

When we think of complex chemistry, we usually think of all the matter that exists on our planet which in our atmosphere is a massive 10 trillion trillion molecules per cubic meter. As we move away from our planet this drops exponentially. However, surprising as it may be, space space – like the interstellar and intergalactic regions – are host to a myriad of molecules. Albeit not at quite the same high densities.

How these molecules formed and became the complex chemistry that we see today remains to be fully understood. It is currently agreed that the early universe consisted of only a few kinds of atoms and it wasn’t until the age of 100,000 years that hydrogen and helium combined to form the first molecule – helium hydride. However, although...

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Origins of Quantumbiology – What is Life?

By Dr. Johanna Deinert, MD, RSF Research Scientist

By the end of 2018 the Royal Society has published a review into the emergence of Quantumbiology as a field of scientific interest. Today, we still need to understand life in the context of its physical environment. Despite the impression this field was new, it emerged in synchronicity with the interpretation of Quantum Physics in the early 20th century – about 90 years ago.

Erwin Schrödinger was not the first to discuss the field of Quantumbiology in his famous 1944 book „What is life?”. Shortly after the mathematical framework of Quantum Mechanics was established in 1927, the field of biophysics and biochemistry flourished. The Organicists sought the middle ground between opposing mechanistic and vitalistic worldviews. Founder of the interdisciplinary field of General System Theory Ludwig von Bertalanffy was one of the early pioneers into the explanation of life. As early as 1928 he discusses a...

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Potential Habitability of Exoplanets

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

featured image credit: Jack O’Malley-James/Cornell University: The intense radiation environments around nearby M stars could favor habitable worlds resembling younger versions of Earth.

A primary prediction of the USN model as presented in the Unified Spacememory Network publication by physicist Nassim Haramein, astrophysicist Amira Val Baker, and biologist William Brown is that the prebiotic chemistry that generates organic compounds and even complex biomolecules is occurring in nebulae throughout galaxies—a postulation that is termed universal biogenesis. Under this model, the precursors to cellular biology are abundant throughout the galactic medium, and therefore there is a very high likelihood that wherever conditions are hospitable to organisms, life will take hold there.

Considering the implications of universal biogenesis, it was very exciting when an Earth-like planet was discovered within...

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Scientists Show That Water Has Memory

By William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Biophysicist

A new groundbreaking discovery has been made within the most basic of resources. Scientists have just discovered what they have called “The Discovery of The Millennium”, and a huge revelation in human consciousness.

Scientists from Germany now believe that water has a memory, meaning that what once was seen as a simple commodity has now been closely examined to reveal a scientific revelation, uncovering a mind-blowing truth.

By examining individual drops of water at an incredibly high magnification, scientists were able to physically see that each droplet of water has its own individual microscopic pattern, each distinguishable from the next and uniquely beautiful.

A scientific experiment was carried out whereby a group of students were all encouraged to obtain one drop of water from the same body of water, all at the same time. Through close examination of the individual droplets, it was seen that each...

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Tetrahedral Geometry of Water Found to Account for it’s Remarkable Properties

biophysics science news Mar 28, 2018
By Resonance Science Foundation

Water-like anomalies as a function of tetrahedrality

Water is the most common and yet least understood material on Earth. Despite its simplicity, water tends to form tetrahedral order locally by directional hydrogen bonding. This structuring is known to be responsible for a vast array of unusual properties, e.g., the density maximum at 4 C, which play a fundamental role in countless natural and technological processes, with the Earth’s climate being one of the most important examples. By systematically tuning the degree of tetrahedrality, we succeed in continuously interpolating between water-like behavior and simple liquid-like behavior. Our approach reveals what physical factors make water so anomalous and special even compared with other tetrahedral liquids. ---John Russo,Kenji Akahane, and Hajime Tanaka. Water-like anomalies as a function of tetrahedrality. PNAS, March 26, 2018.

The properties of water have fascinated scientists for...

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