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Third Planet Detected in Alpha Centauri System, Earth’s Closest Stellar Neighbor

By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

The discovery shows that our closest stellar neighbor seems to be packed with interesting new worlds, within reach of further study and future exploration,” João Faria, lead researcher and astronomer at the Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, Portugal.

A third planet has been detected orbiting our closest stellar neighbor Proxima Centauri in the Alpha Centauri solar system [1]. The Alpha Centauri system, at only 4.3 light years from Earth, is turning out to be a rich and diverse solar system: with an Earth-like planet named Proxima b that orbits in the habitable zone around the low-mass M dwarf star Proxima B— which we discussed in the RSF article ‘Potential Habitability of Exoplanets’ [2]— candidate planet Proxima c which has a much larger orbit outside of the habitable zone, and now Proxima d, with a mass about a quarter of that of...

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Eridanus Supervoid May Explain Cosmic Microwave Background Anomalous Cold Spot

By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

A lot of information about the large-scale nature of the universe can be derived from detailed analysis of its ubiquitous thermal electromagnetic field, called the cosmic microwave background (CMB), for instance analysis of suppressed fluctuations at large wavelengths reveals a closed geometry of the universe— a torus-type geometry as we described in the RSF article A New Signature of a Multiply Connected Universe [1].

Inhomogeneities attributed to quantum fluctuations during the inflationary period are amplified across large-scale universal structure, and when inflation ends, they become density fluctuations and cause the differences in temperature observed in the CMB. Its an intriguing signal to study because it reveals an epoch when atomistic and cosmological structure where one-and-the same, and quantum behaviors that typify nature evolves into large-scale structural features of the universe. (Credit...

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Measuring the Curvature of Space-time Using Time Dilation at Atomic Scale

By physicist Dr. Inés Urdaneta and biophysicist William Brown, research scientists at Resonance Science Foundation

Although quantum mechanics— the physics governing the atomic scale— and relativity— the physics governing the cosmological scale— are still viewed as disparate regimes within the Standard Model (as the Haramein holographic quantum gravitational solution has not reached wide-spread mainstream appeal as of yet), experiments on the quantum scale are reaching the capability of measuring relativistic effects, therefore connecting in practice, what remains disconnected in theory.

Such is the case of the recently observed gravitational Aharonov-Bohm effect—a quantum probe for gravity. In the electromagnetic version of the Aharonov-Bohm effect (in which the highly nonlocal quantum effect was first predicted) an electrically charged particle is affected by an electromagnetic potential, despite being confined to a region in which both the...

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Halogen Atom Sigma Hole Viewed for the First Time

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta / Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

By functionalizing with a single xenon atom the tip probe of a Kelvin force microscope, a group of researchers from the CATRIN of Palacký University in Olomouc, the Institute of Physics of the CAS, the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS, and the IT4Inovations Supercomputing Center at Technical University of Ostrava have achieved an extraordinary increase in the resolution of atomic scanning microscopy, increasing the sensitivity of the microscopy up to sub-atomic level.

Thanks to this achievement, this group -lead by Pavel Jelínek- was able to capture the real image of the anisotropic (asymmetric) electronic charge distribution -called sigma-hole- on single atoms of halogen compounds. The sigma hole (abbreviated as σ-hole) asymmetric electron density distribution was predicted 30 years ago but never observed before, until now.

This prediction is based on the...

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Results of Experiment Reveals that our Understanding of Electrochemistry is Incomplete

By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

Textbooks on electrochemistry are due for an update with the results of a recent study of fuel cells measuring the ion activity around an electrode in a salt solution [1]. There is a classical 100-year-old theory that describes what is thought to be the distribution of ions around such an electrode, at the interface with the electrolyte, where the charge of the electrode attracts ions from the solution and forms what is called an electrical double layer—ions of opposite charge from the electrode crowd around its surface, forming a structure of charges at the interfacial layer.

Gaining a more complete understanding of electrochemistry will be salient to important forms of energy storage and production, like those utilizing fuel cells.

Understanding the molecular structure of the electrode–electrolyte interface is essential in elucidating many interfacial electrochemical phenomena such as corrosion,...

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Evidence of Black Holes Forming Galaxies is Mounting!

Image from ESA, the European Space Agency.


By Dr. Inés Urdaneta / Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

In just one week, two very important studies have shed light on the now irrevocable fact that black holes in the center of galaxies are playing a predominant role in the galaxy formation, event that would explain why astronomers and astrophysicists have found a black hole in the center of galaxies.

In a former RSF article entitled “Supermassive Black Holes Birthing Stars at Furious Rate’ we had addressed the case in which astronomers have observed supermassive black holes creating star-forming regions. Since 2017 a team of astrophysicists have been observing supermassive black holes, and the possibility that these entities could be birthing stars, finding evidence of new star birth from material being ejected from the black hole, called an outflow. An outflow of gas could be responsible for creating new stars by swirling around the center of the black...

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First Spatiotemporal Map of Galactic Local Region Reveals Mechanisms of Star Formation

By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

Most studies of star formation—the “birth” of new stars—have been performed using static 2-dimensional photographs of star forming regions, or nebulae. Now, a new study using 3-D space motions that map stars in 3 dimensions of space, motion, and time astronomers have been able to generate a spatiotemporal map that reveales stars in our local region of the galaxy forming along the surface of an approximately 1000 light year wide bubble [1]. The stars in our “Local Bubble” are all moving away from a central point that appeared to form from several supernovae about 14 million years ago, which triggered expanding shockwaves that initiated condensation of interstellar gases into the discrete surface region of the bubble. The supernovae shockwaves—carrying all the heavy elements of the supernova metallogenesis—are responsible for triggering new star formation via the...

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Study Finds Mobile Genetic Elements Rewiring Genomes

By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

A study published in the journal Science has described the generation of a genetic transcription factor by fusion of a pre-existing gene with the transposase exon of a mobile genetic element [1]. Mobile, or transposable genetic elements cut-and-paste or copy-and-paste their genetic sequence into various sites throughout a genome using a transposase enzyme that they code for. In a survey of all tetrapod (vertebrate animals) genomes available the study identified 106 host-transposase fusion events, in which during transposition, transposase sequences were inserted into a pre-existing gene, resulting in alternative splicing of the gene generating novel functional proteins— many of which are involved in transcriptional regulation. Since transcriptional regulators interact simultaneously with large numbers of genes, up-regulating or down-regulating their expression in the gene network, such events can result in...

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New Study Describes Invariance of the Correlation Structure of Grid Cell Modules in a Manifold with Toroidal Topology

 By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

The part of our brain that is responsible for coding memories—the hippocampal formation— has a complex and specialized system of cells that continuously updates position and direction, generating cognitive maps of our surroundings as we navigate the world. New research published in the journal Nature has shown that the joint activity of neuronal cells that form spatial mapping circuits reside on a toroidal manifold, such that positions on the torus correspond to positions of the environment through which an individual is moving [1].

Neurological studies have shown that the hippocampal formation, which includes the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, contains a diverse array of cell types that support spatial navigation and memory. A key component of this system is the hippocampal place cell, which encodes an animal’s presence at a particular spatial location to support navigation and encoding...

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Rotating Black Holes May Serve as Portals for Interstellar Travel!

 

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta / Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

By means of numerical simulations and computational calculations, a team from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and Georgia Gwinnett College observed that rotating black holes can be traversable. The results were published in Phys. Rev. D, and the calculations were made by Caroline Mallary, student of the research team's director, Gaurav Khanna. 

Mallary wanted to test whether Cooper (played by Matthew McConaughey) in Christopher Nolan's movie Interstellar, could survive the plummet into Gargantua - a fictional, rotating, supermassive black hole about 100 million times the mass of our sun. The physical properties of this black hole were taken from the book written by Nobel laureate Kip Thorne, on which the film was based. 

These mysterious creatures called black holes, are regions in space where there is an enormous accumulation of energy/matter, concentrated in such a small volume...

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