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Beyond Science Fiction! Extracting Energy from Black Holes

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

In 1969, Roger Penrose proposed a method to extract rotational energy of a rotating black hole, and suggested that an advanced civilization could achieve it by lowering and then releasing a mass from a structure that is co-rotating with the black hole. The process would occur in the region just outside the event horizon, called the ergosphere, where frame-dragging is at its strongest, being able to tear apart an object; one part would enter the event horizon while the remaining one would be accelerated outwards with an additional impulse given by the rotational energy of the black hole. The excess energy calculated by Penrose was estimated to be 21 percent more than the incoming energy.


The process is brilliantly explained in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=23&v=ES2VxhRAkUM&feature=emb_logo


Inspired by Penrose’s idea, Yakov Zel’dovich...

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Quantum Computing via Electroluminescence

By Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Astrophysicist

The first steps to achieving efficient electroluminescence necessary for quantum computing have just been made.

Quantum computers encode information in quantum bits otherwise known as qubits. These qubits can exist in the form of a photon or an electron, where the polarisation state of the photon or the spin state of the electron is taken as two bits of information. However, as opposed to classical bits, qubits can also exist in a superposition of states which allows the computer to process significantly more information and at a faster rate. This rate is limited by the transfer of information, which for an electron-spin qubit has so far proven difficult. Currently this has been achieved for distances up to millimetre scales, which although large from the qubit’s perspective, it is too small for practical applications.

To achieve the long-distance kilometre-scale transfer of quantum information encoded as...

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The First Image of a Black Hole is Finally Here!

black holes science news Apr 29, 2020

 By Dr. Ines Urdaneta, Research Scientist at Resonance Science Foundation.
 
For some time now we have been following the Event Horizon Telescope initiative (EHT) aiming at the obtention of the first image of the EH of a Black Hole (BH) for Sagittarius A (Sag. A*), located at the center of our own galaxy, the milky way. Given the fact that Sag. A* nuclei is much less active that Messier 87 (M87*), the image reported first is that of M87*. Even though M87* is 2000 times farther away, it is 2000 times more massive. This compensates exactly the distance, with a higher nuclei activity allowing a better resolution and faster data analysis than Sag. A*.

So finally, the day has come! The moment couldn't be more exciting. First EHT results for the shadow of the BH, which is 55 million light years away from Earth, with a mass 6.5 billion times the mass of our Sun and located at the center of M87*, have been announced worldwide today, April 10th 2019, at the same time by different...

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What’s Really Going on Inside a Neutron Star

science news Mar 14, 2020
by Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Scientists are finally getting closer to figuring out the puzzle of the structure of neutron stars and revealing the nature of their ultra-dense interiors.

In theories of stellar evolution, neutron stars are considered one of the end states of stars, along with white dwarfs and black holes. As a star evolves it will enter stages of expansion as hydrogen is fused into helium and so on through the periodic table of elements. Depending on the mass of the star, a limit will be reached whereby nuclear fusion can no longer take place and the star is no longer able to overcome the immense gravitational force which it has been holding back for all these years. As a result, the star implodes, ejecting its outer layers as a planetary nova or a supernova, leaving only a mere remnant of its former self behind – or so the story goes.

For massive stars, the implosion is so great that it crushes its stellar matter to...

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Frame-Dragging Caught in Action

astrophysics science news Feb 14, 2020
by Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Research Scientist

An astrophysical system has just demonstrated frame dragging for the first time.

The dragging of space time by a rotating mass, otherwise known as frame-dragging, was predicted by Einstein’s general relativity. Einstein postulated that not only does a mass curve spacetime, but it will also drag local spacetime into motion around itself as it rotates, much like the air in a tornado. The amount of drag is thus directly proportional to the spin.

A few years later, in 1918, Austrian physicists Josef Lense and Hans Thirring predicted that the dragging of spacetime due to a rotating celestial body – frame-dragging – would force a nearby orbiting body into precession. That is, the closer you are to the rotating body, the more you are pulled around with it – which for another rotating body forces its axis of rotation to continuously change direction with the changing pull along the orbit. This effect is now...

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Tuning Cells for Health and Wellness

science news Jan 08, 2020
by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Resonance-based technologies utilize harmonic interactions to effortlessly produce significant effects. This is why the potential for applications in energy production is so promising: methods employing harmonic resonance can do more with less energy. Additionally, technologies employing harmonic resonance offer a potential means for benefiting health and wellness of the biological system without deleterious side-effects.

With such potential applications, Torus Tech is developing the resonant modulation capabilities of its plasma-hydrodynamic and harmonic frequency technologies to direct beneficial signaling in the extra-cellular matrix for restorative and bio-regenerative therapies. Such techniques offer a highly efficacious and non-invasive method to restore healthy operations of the body and to target specific conditions such as injury and cancer.

The extra-cellular matrix (ECM) is a part of the body-wide...

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Patterns of water in light: optical solitons observed in non-linear medium

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Biophysicist

Researchers studying the wave propagation of light in nonlocal, nonlinear media have observed that it behaves the same as waves in water. The researchers observed optical soliton interactions that produce complex waveforms. A soliton or solitary wave is a self-reinforcing wave packet that maintains its shape while it propagates at a constant velocity.

A soliton is a unique kind of wave that is much more stable than ordinary waves and can propagate for long distances, so much so that even after collisions these solitary waves continue propagating nearly unperturbed. Soliton waves can often be observed naturally occurring in shallow areas of water, and indeed, in the latest study, researchers demonstrated that the same equation—the Kadomtsev-Petvishvili II equation—that models water solution interactions can also be used to model optical solution interactions in the exact same way, revealing that the same wave...

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Bioengineer Researchers Discover New Type of Cell Communication

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Biophysicist

Collective intercellular communication through ultra-fast hydrodynamic trigger waves:

Researchers studying one of the longest single cell organisms—Spirostomum ambiguum—which can grow up to lengths of 4mm (a unicellular organism observable to the naked eye) have discovered that it is also one of the fastest cells ever documented. The gargantuan protist can contract its long body by 60% within milliseconds, experiencing an acceleration force of up to 14g.

The contractile behavior protects the unicellular organism from would-be predators, as small vacuoles along the cellular membrane containing toxins are dispersed when undergoing the extreme g forces of the contraction. Remarkably, researchers have discovered that the contractions also generate long-ranged vortex flows that function as hydrodynamic signals to other Spirostomum.

This is the first time that hydrodynamic cellular signaling has been documented, and...

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Potential Habitability of Exoplanets

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

featured image credit: Jack O’Malley-James/Cornell University: The intense radiation environments around nearby M stars could favor habitable worlds resembling younger versions of Earth.

A primary prediction of the USN model as presented in the Unified Spacememory Network publication by physicist Nassim Haramein, astrophysicist Amira Val Baker, and biologist William Brown is that the prebiotic chemistry that generates organic compounds and even complex biomolecules is occurring in nebulae throughout galaxies—a postulation that is termed universal biogenesis. Under this model, the precursors to cellular biology are abundant throughout the galactic medium, and therefore there is a very high likelihood that wherever conditions are hospitable to organisms, life will take hold there.

Considering the implications of universal biogenesis, it was very exciting when an Earth-like planet was discovered within...

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Nature’s Effective Way of Conducting Electrons

by Dr. Olivier Alirol, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Circulation of electrons is essential in electronics and also for living organisms. While in our computers, we use semiconductor made mainly of silicon crystal, Nature has found a more effective way: proteins. Protein structures facilitate long-range electron-transfer. Scientists have shown that structural features of proteins have elements that facilitate electronic conductivity.

This phenomenon is largely due to the chiral-induced spin selectivity (CISS). It causes in particular the reduction of the elastic backscattering in electron-transfer through chiral molecules. In fact, electron transmission shows that ordered films of chiral organic molecules act as electron spin filters. The CISS effect gives us important insight for spin-selective processes in biology and allows the use of chiral molecules in spintronics applications.

The electron-transfer process allows for the transfer of energy and information...

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