Forum Store Events About Science Research Courses DONATE Login

 

Science News
& Faculty Articles

 

Graphene Proves That Brownian Motion Can Be A Source of Energy!

Article by Ines Urdaneta, Physicist, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Graphene, one of the most important nanomaterials developed so far, continues to surprise the scientific community. This time, thanks to the extraordinary phenomena found by a group of physicists from the University of Arkansas. We are talking specifically about the capacity to use the thermal motion of atoms in graphene as a source of energy!

In this recent work, published in Physical Review E under the title Fluctuation-induced current from freestanding graphene, the team of researchers have successfully developed a circuit capable of capturing graphene's thermal motion and converting it into an electrical current. 

As it is said in this article: "The idea of harvesting energy from graphene is controversial because it refutes physicist Richard Feynman's well-known assertion that the thermal motion of atoms, known as Brownian motion, cannot do work. Thibado's team found that at room...

Continue Reading...

The Big Bang: A Big Bounce?

Article by Dr. Ines Urdaneta, Physicist and Research Scientist at Resonance Science Foundation

Image by Samuel Velasco/Quanta Magazine

The most spread worldview on the origin of our Universe, is that of the big explosion, commonly known as the Big Bang (BB). We have asked ourselves what happens right after, at the first instants of the universe… the most accepted view among cosmologists is that of an exponential expansion, called the inflation theory.

The BB theory results from doing a backward-in-time evolution to the universes' expansion. If it is expanding as time moves forward, this implies the universe was smaller, denser and hotter in the distant past. The BB theory predicts that the early universe was much denser and extremely hot, about 273 million degrees above absolute zero, too hot for atoms to exist, only free electrons and hydrogen nuclei – protons and neutrons- where present.  After cooling during the expansion, these nuclei and electrons...

Continue Reading...

2020 Physics Nobel Prize to Black Holes!

Article by Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Recently awarded the Nobel prize for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity, Sir Roger Penrose had earlier developed a theory known as “conformal cyclic cosmology“ (CCC) which posits that the universe iterates through infinite cycles, from one aeon to the next, such that the universe became uniform before rather than after the Big Bang. Each cycle starts out from a singularity before expanding and generating clumps of matter, which eventually gets sucked up by supermassive black holes, which over the very long term disappear by continuously emitting Hawking radiation. This process restores uniformity and sets the stage for the next Big Bang. In CCC, the future time-like infinity of each previous iteration being identified with the Big Bang singularity of the next. Penrose popularized this theory in his 2010 book Cycles of Time:...

Continue Reading...

Is the Physical World a Neural Network?

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta. Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

In a former RSF article entitled Between the Generalized Holographic approach and Data Science, we addressed the potential of trained artificial neural networks to replace our scientific models, and the possibility of reality being a numerical simulation was discussed. Somehow we had anticipated this next and very recent work from Vitaly Vanchurin, from the University of Minnesota Duluth, proposing that we live in a neural network. It is an audacious idea!


In our prior article we had anticipated the impact of artificial neural networks and deep machine learning … what we had not foreseen was that they would be used literally as the framework for the theory of everything! There is a saying: "better be a historian, than a prophet", meaning that a historian writes about past events, and so taking small risk, while a prophet takes a huge risk with his predictions. Though, we should not brag about this...

Continue Reading...

Blue And Green Colors On Nature Are More Intense … Why?

By Ines Urdaneta, PhD in Physics and Researcher at Resonance Science Foundation.

Image: Evan Leeson/Bob Peterson/lowjumpingfrog. None of these animals contain a single trace of blue pigment.

Colors in nature come mainly from three sources: pigments, structural colors, and bioluminescence.

Have you noticed that some colors are more intense than others in nature?
Such is the case of blue and green colors, compared to reds and the rest. The main reason is that blue and green can be structural colors, while the remaining colors seem to not be part of the team.

Structural coloring is the result of microscopically fine structured surfaces that interfere with visible light, sometimes in combination with pigments. For example, peacock tail feathers are brown pigmented, but because of their microscopic structure, they also reflect blue, turquoise and green light. And they are often iridescent. Thus, structural coloring is a classic optical effect of interference and diffraction, rather than a...

Continue Reading...

First Virtual Reality Simulation of a Supermassive Black Hole

Article by: Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

 As mentioned in a previous article, the Event Horizon Telescope is an international collaboration aiming to obtain the first real image of the event horizon (EH) of a black hole using a set of antennas scattered around the globe. EHT has been monitoring and collecting data from the supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) at the core of the Milky Way galaxy, known as Sagittarius A*, and results are expected very soon, probably 2019.

Now, for the first time, the virtual reality simulation of Sagittarius A* has been achieved by a group of scientists at Radbound University and collaborators from the Institute of theoretical Physics, in Germany, and the Mullard Space Science laboratory, at the University College London. In their article “Observing Supermassive Black Holes in virtual reality”, published last week, authors explain the methodology for the obtention of a full 360° view...

Continue Reading...

A Virtual Telescope the Size of the Earth!

Article by Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Up to 2016, the biggest telescopes were composed of an array of antennas located in a particular site, like the one at Atacama Desert, in Chile. called ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/ Submillimeter Array). Its construction dates from 2004 and consists of sixty-six 8-to-12-meter diameter antennas aiming to receive millimeter wavelengths. Among others things, ALMA is capable of performing deep space detections, what allows to obtain information about the first stars and galaxies that emerged billions of years ago at huge distances from us. Due to the universe expansion, most of these objects’ emissions have stretched out to the millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

Using a technique known as interferometry – or interference pattern between the signals received by each antenna, to recompose a complete unique image- the 66 antennas at ALMA work together as though they were a single...

Continue Reading...

From Somewhere … To Everywhere!

Article by by Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Atomic Hydrogen (H) – the first element in our periodic table – has given an unexpected and unprecedented apparition. A recent study by Lutz Wisotzki of the Leibniz Institute of Astrophysics in Potsdam and collaborators from different institutions reveals the presence of H all over the sky, including the apparent empty space between galaxies. This was concluded after detecting one of the traits that characterize the H element, and that is part of the digital print of the atom, called “spectrum”. We refer to the Lyman-alpha transition of atomic hydrogen at a wavelength of 121.6 nanometers.


(Ly-α in Figure 1), corresponding to a frequency of 2.47×1015 hertz.

The Lyman-alpha line is in the ultraviolet section of the electromagnetic spectrum. Because it is absorbed by air, its astronomical detection must be carried out by satellite-borne instruments,...

Continue Reading...
Close

50% Complete

Two Step

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.