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The Generalized Holographic Model, Part III: The Electron and the Holographic Mass Solution

The first direct observation of the orbital structure of an excited hydrogen atom, made using a newly developed "quantum microscope." (Stodolna et al. / Physical Review Letters).


By Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

In the first part of this series, entitled The Generalized Holographic Model, Part I: The Holographic Principle, we introduced the holographic principle as developed by David Bohm, Gerard 't Hooft, Jacob Bekenstein and Stephen Hawking. This principle states that the information contained in the volume of a Black hole is holographically present in the boundary or event horizon of the black hole. Then, in the second part The generalized holographic model part II: Quantum Gravity and the Holographic Mass Solution, we introduced Nassim Haramein's generalization of such principle, where he includes the volume information or degrees of freedom in the volume as well. This generalization allows to define a holographic ratio that accounts...

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Origin of Quantum Mechanics III: The Atomic Structure and the Electron

Source of Image here.  

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta  / Physicist at  Resonance Science Foundation

In our previous article entitled Origin of Quantum Mechanics II: Black Body Radiation and Quantization of the Electromagnetic Field we saw that quantum mechanics started from the combined results of two experiments called black body radiation and photoelectric effect, which indicated that matter could only exchange energy -absorb or emit- through discrete packets, quanta of energy that were called photons, which gave a corpuscular aspect to light. Light, which is observed macroscopically as a continuous wave, must then be composed of these discrete packets of energy called photons. This allowed light and matter to exchange photons, i.e., integer units of energy.

The main interlocutor between light and atoms are the electrons that make up the atom. Roughly speaking, it is the electron inside the atom that absorbs or emits electromagnetic radiation in the material, which,...

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Contextuality: An Obscure Yet Powerful Feature of Quantum Mechanics

By Amal Pushp, Affiliate Physicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

A pair of quantum entities spatially separated in the network of spacetime displays a mysterious correlation when measured. This quantum correlation is commonly referred to as entanglement. In the current age, phenomena involving entanglement and its diverse applications are inevitable, however, it would be quite surprising to the reader at first that this quantum phenomenon was dismissed as an impossible spooky scenario by none other than Albert Einstein who is believed to be one of the founding fathers of quantum physics itself.

Entanglement, also popularly known as non-locality within scientific circles, has become a well-established topic over the decades. However, there is another quantum aspect that is equally interesting but probably most of us haven’t heard of it. This lesser-known phenomenon of quantum mechanics is termed contextuality. To put it simply, contextuality says that properties of...

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Controlling the Quantum Vacuum for Energy Transfer and Functional Casimir Devices

Researchers Devise Method to Control Quantum Vacuum Fluctuations for Unidirectional Energy Transfer Between Two Nanodevices


By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

A fundamental outcome of quantum field theory is the prediction of an ever-present non-zero energy in the vacuum state. In classical physics, a vacuum is totally devoid of energy or substance. In modern physics, all forces and associated particles are field-like, and their manifestation is a result of excitations of the respective quantum field. As such, according to quantum field theory, even in a vacuum there are quantum fields, and importantly these fields are always undergoing random excitations, even at the point where there should be zero energy—i.e., there are constitutive zero-point energy fluctuations.

These quantum vacuum energy fluctuations are not trivial, in the theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) they are what gives hadrons, like the proton, their mass. Within QCD...

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What is Resonance and Why is it so Important?

Image: Linden Gledhill, a Philadelphia-based pharmaceutical biochemist creates incredible cymatic pattterns with sound, water and light. 

By Inés Urdaneta, Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

Resonance is experienced, and even identified as the process being responsible for the forms of what we perceive, observe, or infer based on it - an atom, a flower, planets, galaxies -. It binds together the different elements that make up physical reality and allows interaction between them. It is the main factor for feedback to be possible, the conduit, shall we say, through which the exchange of information happens: the external can penetrate the internal, and the internal can manifest outside. The condition for that channel to be available, is the coincidence in energy; that the inner and outer energies are compatible. i. e., that they have the same frequency.

 

Source of Image: https://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/06/16/4022877.htm

 

In general, we...

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Entanglement over 33 Km! New Distance Record

By Inés Urdaneta, Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

Entanglement, coined by Einstein as “spooky action at a distance”, has achieved a new record for long distance communication, as a team from Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (LMU) and Saarland University have reported in Nature [1].

Entanglement is the property by which two quantum objects, such as atoms, are connected in such a way that their quantum state can’t be described independently from the other. Hence, when a change happens in one of the objects, the other object modifies its state as to preserve the relationship between them, no matter the distance between them.  

This feature seems to defy Einstein’s special relativity, in which nothing, not even information could travel faster that the speed of light. It is as if the correlation between entangled particles was preserved “instantaneously” by some miraculous mechanism implying an intrinsic nonlocality of...

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Cooling Down Carbon Molecules Using a Laser

Credit: VENTRIS/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

By Amal Pushp, Affiliate Physicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

Quantum mechanics prohibits any quantum system from achieving a temperature that is equal to absolute zero.  However, using Laser cooling, which is a highly efficient spectroscopic technique, atomic samples could be cooled to near absolute zero thus bringing them to their lowest achievable quantum energy state. Scientists have been advancing this technique for decades now and an important question that arose recently is whether carbon molecules, which are an integral component of life on earth, could be laser-cooled.  

In order to cool down any atom or molecule using a laser the first step is to understand the mechanism behind the absorption and emission of light. Knowing this is important because the same process is responsible for reducing the kinetic energy of the atom/molecule and bringing it to the lowest possible energy state (look at the...

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TV and Video Game Streaming with a Quantum Receiver

By: William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

In a previous article by Resonance Science Physical Chemist Dr. Ines Urdaneta an experiment that possibly demonstrates non-trivial quantum mechanical properties in microtubules was discussed. In the experiment, laser light shone on microtubules was absorbed, and had a delayed re-emission on physiologically relevant timescales [1]. The laser light was being absorbed by atoms and molecules within the microtubules and altering their properties before being re-emitted. This is a quantum mechanical process, and hints at potential quantum information processing in the biological system. In a seeming demonstration of how this process can be used in the transfer of information, a team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have utilized a similar process to stream video with a quantum receiver [2].

The team had already used their quantum receiver to stream music with AM / FM reception [3], but now they...

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The Origin of Quantum Mechanics II : the Black Body Radiator and the Quantization of the Electromagnetic Field

Image: Ekaterina Kulaeva/Shutterstock 

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta / Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

In a past article entitled “The origin of quantum mechanics I: The Electromagnetic field as a wave” we had introduced the most relevant features of light as an electromagnetic field propagating in a 3D trajectory through space. Among the notions addressed we had explained the spectrum -or colors- of light, the components of the electromagnetic fields and their continuous, wavelike nature. In this second article we explain why the wavelike nature of light was not enough to explain certain behaviors of the interaction between light and matter; the understanding of such phenomena required introducing a “corpuscular” description of light that marked the origin of quantum theory, changing the paradigm with respect to classical physics.     

 

 The Black body Radiator and the quantization of the electromagnetic field...
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The Origin of Quantum Mechanics I: The Electromagnetic Field as a Wave

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta / Physicist at Resonance Science Foundation

 

Electromagnetic spectrum of light 

We are used to the words light and color. In scientific terms, light is made of electromagnetic waves that are mainly radiated from a radiative source (for instance, the sun) and absorbed by an object (absorbed by the electrons in the atoms that make the object, for instance, a T-shirt). An electromagnetic wave traveling through space is an energy oscillation propagating through space in 3 dimensions; traveling, for instance, from A to B along the red curved trajectory (known as circularly polarized motion) shown in the Figure below, depicting the complete movement which forms a helical trajectory. The axes x, y, and z serve as frames of reference for the movement. Note that the helical red curve has a 3D red tubular shadow to emphasize the 3D shape of this whole movement; it is a vortex spiraling helical through space. This red trajectory can be separated into two...

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