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NASA’s Helical Engine Design that Uses Closed-Cycle Propellant; A Proposed Stardrive that May Enable Interstellar Travel

by William Brown, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Twentieth Century technology has relied on the use of fuels and chemical propellants to propel our ships, planes, and cars. The propulsion technology of the future will not use chemical combustion to produce thrust, and the 21st century will see the emergence of propellant-less propulsion systems. Such technologies will provide the means to travel faster than ever before at a fraction of current costs and with no pollution by-products.

This becomes absolutely crucial for interplanetary and interstellar travel, as we have stated before in RSF commentary1 reporting on Resonance-based technology may provide inertial mass reduction—the future of space travel will not be performed with chemical propellants. As an example, to date the most viable proposal for an interstellar mission with current technological capabilities is the Breakthrough Starshot project which will use a fleet of light sail probes propelled to...

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The Mathematics of Relationships, AI and Human Eco space

by Johanna Deinert, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

“Category theory provides a structural framework for mathematics and is on its way to becoming a language for consciousness in the universe.” Learn how it relates to Haramein’s Holofractal Universe.

Forbes Magazine recently shed light on the fact that “there is a growing belief that the current understanding of science cannot wholly explain human life, mind, and consciousness, nor can it explain the nature and origin of life, matter, the environment, the universe and reality“. It summarizes a podcast held by the Author Jayshree Pandya called Risk Roundup, where she discussed Category Theory for application in cyberspace, aquaspace, geospace and space (CAGS) with Mathematical Physicist and Professor of Mathematics Dr. Baez.

Beyond doubt, the human body is an open system, so physical laws that do require a closed system, are applicable only under certain conditions – a mathematical...

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Black Gold Material Breakthrough!

by Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

“Black” gold that harvests sunlight and uses it to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) into useful chemicals and fuel, has been developed by a team of researchers from India and Seoul.

One of the most amazing things about nanomaterials, concerns their design properties. It´s astonishing how in a nanoparticle of a particular element, the same atom disposed in different geometries from that of the bulk confers a completely different behavior regarding chemical or physical properties (conductivity, resistance, melting point, etc) to that of the bulk material … it´s like we were dealing with a completely different element!

In the case of the new, and black, gold, by varying the inter-particle distance between gold nanoparticles through a cycle-by-cycle growth approach and optimizing the nucleation-growth step with dendritic fibrous nanosilica, researcher from...

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Resonance-based technology may provide inertial mass reduction

By William Brown, Biophysicist with the Resonance Science Foundation

US Navy Researcher Obtains Patents for Inertial Mass Reduction Device, Gravity Wave Generator, and Room-Temperature Superconductor.

In previous posts we have reported on the development of a novel propulsion device that does not require the emission of propellant or the combustion of chemical compounds. Instead, the device uses electromagnetic resonance to create thrust by emitting microwaves into a resonant cavity, giving it the moniker the EMdrive—EM for electromagnetic, as well as a play on the word “impossible drive” because due to the uniqueness of this form of thrust-generation, and the lack of understanding of exactly how thrust would be produced from this technology, it is thought by many scientist to be impossible.

Despite the strong skepticism and controversy regarding the theoretical foundations of the technology, actual empirical testing done at both Northwestern Polytechnical...

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Super-Fast 3D Printers

By Dr. Amira Val Baker, Resonance Science Foundation Astrophysicist

A new printer known as the ‘replicator’ could soon make the innovative and futuristic 3D printers a thing of the past.

3D printers came about in the early 1980’s and were considered a modern miracle. They work by depositing a material, such as plastic, layer by layer to reproduce a 3D generated computer image. Since their humble beginnings, and massively expensive prices, in which they were only able to produce functional prototypes they have since made significant advancements in precision. With such precision and the relatively lower prices they have become common place for the production of anything and everything from aerospace and automotive to medical.

However, researchers in California have now unveiled a new 3D printer known as the ‘replicator’. Based on tomography – which is the process of obtaining a 3D image of non-visible ‘internal’ structure by combining...

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Topological Materials: A New Dimension of Properties and Their Amazing Applications

By Dr. Inés Urdaneta, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

The word topology refers to the contours of a surface or the shape of an object. In mathematics, topology classifies objects by the number of holes they have. A ball is a sphere with no hole, whereas a doughnut, with its one hole, is topologically different. The ball is topologically equivalent to an apple, and a doughnut to a cup, but not to a ball or a pretzel, since going from one topology to another would require a dramatic change, like ripping a hole. For this reason, the topological states discovered in some materials are robust and resist disruptions, unless they are as dramatic as the one mentioned previously.

Topological materials provide certain electronic states that persist despite a modification to their physical shape. What’s important isn’t the shape itself but the structure of its electronic bands; regions of electronic energy distribution particular to each material. The...

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A Two Layers Graphene Superconductor Material

Article by Dr. Olivier Alirol, Physicist, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist

Scientists have discovered that a two graphene layers can conduct electrons showing superconductivity if the two hexagonal nets are twisted against each other at a 1.1 degree angle. This finding could lead to room-temperature superconductors, a hypothetical material exhibiting superconductivity at temperatures above 0 °C (273.15 K). Most superconductors work only at temperatures close to absolute zero. Even ‘high-temperature’ superconductors are working in reality at  −140 ºC. A material that displayed the property at room temperature — eliminating the need for expensive cooling — could revolutionize energy transmission, medical scanners and transport.

Increasing the temperature at which superconductivity occurs could have phenomenal technological applications

A current that could flow forever without losing any energy means transmission of power...

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Friction Has Memory, Say Physicists

science news technology Jun 19, 2018
Article by Resonance Science Foundation

Experiments by Sam Dillavou and Shmuel Rubinstein at Harvard University have, for the first time, revealed that the friction between two surfaces has a “memory”. This means that the force can depend not only on the present state of the interface but also on how the interface has reached its current state.

This new insight could have a bearing on how physicists characterize friction in materials such as rock, metals and paper and apply to a wide range of physical systems from micromachines to earthquakes.

Contact area

The amount of friction generated by two surfaces is directly related to their contact area. Microscopic irregularities in the surfaces are gradually flattened as time progresses, increasing the contact area and therefore increasing friction.

Under these conditions, the contact area, and thus friction, increases logarithmically with time in a process known as ageing. “The observed behaviour is...

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Back to the Future as Researchers Invent Real-Life Flux Capacitor

The "Back to the Future" time machine runs on an imaginary flux capacitor but could the movie invention become reality?

In the popular movie franchise Back to the Future, an eccentric scientist creates a time machine that runs on a flux capacitor.

Now a group of actual physicists from Australia (RMIT University, University of Queensland) and Switzerland (ETH Zurich) have proposed a similar device that can break time-reversal symmetry.

While their flux capacitor doesn’t enable time travel, it’s a critical step in future technologies like the quantum computer and could lead to better electronics for mobile phones and wifi.

The research, published in Physical Review Letters, proposes a new generation of electronic circulators - devices that control the direction in which microwave signals move.

RMIT’s Professor Jared Cole said the device proposed in the research was built from a superconductor, in which electricity can flow without electrical...

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A Massless Particle Which Could Revolutionize Electronics

Article by Dr. Olivier Alirol, Physicist, Resonance Science Foundation Research Scientist


In 2015, after 85 years of searching, researchers confirmed the existence of a massless particle called the Weyl fermion. With the unique ability to behave as both matter and anti-matter inside a crystal, this quasiparticle is like an electron with no mass. The story begun in 1928 when Dirac proposed an equation for the foundational unification of quantum mechanics and special relativity in describing the nature of the electron.  This new equation suggested three distinct forms of relativistic particles:  the Dirac, the Majorana, and the Weyl fermions. And recently, an analog of Weyl fermions has been discovered in certain electronic materials exhibiting a strong spin orbit coupling and topological behavior. Just as Dirac fermions emerge as signatures of topological insulators, in certain types of semimetals, electrons can behave like Weyl fermions.

These Weyl fermions are what can be...

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